No Time for Games

Here’s how the game is played. First, public education special interest groups vigorously oppose any and all constitutionally permissible arrangements that would place public funds in the hands of low-income parents for the purpose of enabling them to send their children to the schools of their choosing, whether public, public charter, or private. Then,…

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In it Together

The California Senate resumed formal activity last week, following an extended spring recess. It was hardly business as usual.  There was but one hearing scheduled – an April 16 meeting of a budget subcommittee tasked with getting a handle on the economic fallout from the COVID-19 pandemic.  Face mask snugly in place, Senator Holly…

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One Shining Moment

Last week, while listening to “All Things Considered” on NPR, I heard a member of the Colorado Legislature, his voice choked with emotion, relate how a longtime political rival approached him and gave him a hug. (That, of course, occurred before social distancing practices took effect.) Two days earlier, while watching the proceedings of…

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Showdown in New York: Part Two

Last November, New York Commissioner of Education MaryEllen Elia jolted the state’s private school community by issuing guidelines requiring public school boards to ensure that private schools operating within their boundaries are providing an educational program that is “substantially equivalent” to that offered by district public schools.  The directive, seen by many as a…

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When Teachers Unions Supported Private School Choice

For those who long to see teachers union representatives offering legislative testimony in support of parental choice of private schools, you’ve come to the right place!  We hearken back to the halcyon days of May, 2001, when the California Legislature’s Senate Education Committee considered a bill authored by former State Senator Ray Haynes.  The…

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