No Time for Games

Here’s how the game is played. First, public education special interest groups vigorously oppose any and all constitutionally permissible arrangements that would place public funds in the hands of low-income parents for the purpose of enabling them to send their children to the schools of their choosing, whether public, public charter, or private. Then,…

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In it Together

The California Senate resumed formal activity last week, following an extended spring recess. It was hardly business as usual.  There was but one hearing scheduled – an April 16 meeting of a budget subcommittee tasked with getting a handle on the economic fallout from the COVID-19 pandemic.  Face mask snugly in place, Senator Holly…

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One Shining Moment

Last week, while listening to “All Things Considered” on NPR, I heard a member of the Colorado Legislature, his voice choked with emotion, relate how a longtime political rival approached him and gave him a hug. (That, of course, occurred before social distancing practices took effect.) Two days earlier, while watching the proceedings of…

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The ‘Ins’ and ‘Outs’ of Private School Lobbying

February has come to be my least favorite month of the year. This disposition has nothing to do with the weather, the end of the professional football season, the prevalence of colds and flu – the odds of contracting influenza during the month of February are at least twice that of any other month…

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Here’s an IDEA: Follow the Law!

In the state of Massachusetts a coalition of Catholic, Jewish, and Christian private school leaders had long suspected numerous public school districts of falling short on their obligation to identify, evaluate, and help parentally-placed private students with disabilities. Calling their initiative Project Access, the group submitted a complaint to the state’s Department of Elementary…

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